Does Medicare Cover Gynecology?

Does Medicare Cover Gynecology?

Gynecology, often grouped with obstetrics, is a branch of medicine that specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the female reproductive organs, according to the National Cancer Institute. Gynecology also specializes in other women’s health issues, such as menopause, hormone problems, contraception and infertility. Original Medicare Part B (medical insurance) covers a number of important gynecology services.

What gynecology services does Medicare cover?

One role of gynecology is to screen for cancer. Pelvic exams and pap tests to check for cervical and vaginal cancer are covered once every 24 months for all women with Medicare Part B, as long as your doctor accepts Medicare. If you’re at high risk for cervical or vaginal cancer or if you’re of childbearing age and had an abnormal Pap test in the past 36 months, you qualify for these gynecology screenings once every 12 months under Medicare.

As part of the gynecology exam, women are also covered for a clinical breast exam to check for breast cancer. In addition, women ages 35 to 39 with Medicare can get one baseline mammogram, and women age 40 and older with Medicare can get a screening mammogram every 12 months. The provider must accept Medicare assignment. If a diagnostic mammogram is required, then you would have to pay 20% of the Medicare-approved amount, and the Part B deductible applies.

Women might also ask their gynecologists about sexually transmitted infections (STI) screenings and counseling, another important part of gynecology. Part B covers tests for chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, and/or hepatitis B once every 12 months or at certain times during pregnancy.

Medicare will also cover up to two individual behavioral counseling sessions each year for sexually active adults who are determined by a health-care provider to be at increased risk for STIs. There’s generally no cost for STI screenings or counseling for a Medicare beneficiary as long as the provider accepts Medicare assignment.

Medicare may cover other health issues in the field of gynecology, such as endometriosis, incontinence, uterine fibroids, ovarian cysts, and urinary tract infections.

Want to learn more about how Medicare covers gynecology?

You may able to obtain Medicare coverage beyond the benefits offered by Original Medicare, Part A and Part B through a Medicare Advantage plan. Want to learn more? I can help. Use one of the links below to set up a phone call or get an email with personalized information. Use the Compare Plans buttons on this page.

Call Medicare.com’s licensed insurance agents at 1-844-847-2660, TTY users 711; Monday through Friday, 8AM to 8PM ET.

Reprinted content from an article by Victoria Burke and appears at Medicare.com under articles and the coverage category.

New Medicare Cards Protect Your Personal Information

New Medicare Cards Protect Your Personal Information

https://www.medicare.gov/new card

Starting in April 2018, Medicare will mail new Medicare cards to all people with Medicare, to help protect you from identity fraud. Fraudsters are always looking for ways to get your Social Security Number so they’re removing Social Security Numbers from all Medicare cards to make them safer.

Your new card will have a new Medicare Number that’s unique to you. The new card will help protect your identity and keep your personal information more secure. Your Medicare coverage and benefits stay the same.
And there’s more good news—Medicare will automatically mail your new card at no cost to the address you have on file with Social Security. There’s nothing you need to do! If you need to update your official mailing address, visit your online my Social Security account or call 1-800-772-1213.

Once you get your new Medicare card, take these 3 steps to make it harder for someone to steal your information and identity:

1. Destroy your old Medicare card right away.
2. Use your new card. Doctors, other health care providers, and plans approved by Medicare know that Medicare is replacing the old cards. They are ready to accept your new card when you need care.
3. Beware of people contacting you about your new Medicare card and asking you for your Medicare Number, personal information, or to pay a fee for your new card. Treat your Medicare Number like you treat your Social Security or credit card numbers. Remember, Medicare will never contact you uninvited to ask for your personal information.

This information was taken from: https://blog.medicare.gov/2018/01/25/new-medicare-cards-protect-personal-information/